Awards

The National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences will postpone the 47th Annual Daytime Emmy Awards, which had been scheduled for June. “Given our concerns over the COVID-19 pandemic, we have decided that we will not be staging the 47th Annual Daytime Emmy Awards in Pasadena this coming June,” NATAS chairman Terry O’Reilly said in
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As concern grows over coronavirus (COVID-19), the Television Academy has stopped the practice of talent and other panel participants from interacting with audience members during For Your Consideration events. That ban on interactions includes autographs, selfies, meet-and-greets and questions from the audience, the org told members in a note sent out on Friday. The decision
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The 92nd annual Academy Awards quickly lost its own plot amid a million distractions courtesy of ABC’s frenetic, often baffling production decisions. But then, through the sheer pleasure of the groundbreaking winners of “Parasite” breaking through the expected narrative to triumph, the show became something far more beautifully chaotic than the show’s producers could have
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Netflix’s “American Factory,” produced by Michelle and Barack Obama, took home the award for best documentary at the 92nd Oscars. It’s the first Academy Award for the Obamas’ production company, Higher Ground. The former president and first lady weren’t able to attend Sunday’s ceremony in Hollywood. The award was accepted by the film’s co-directors Steven
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Todd Phillips’ “Joker,” a comic-book origin story about Batman’s biggest foe, scored a leading 11 Oscar nominations for the 92nd Academy Awards, including best picture, best director for Phillips and best actor for Joaquin Phoenix. Martin Scorsese’s mob epic “The Irishman,” Quentin Tarantino’s ode to Los Angeles “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” and Sam
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Every year, controversy mounts over some Oscar selection. Whether it’s the lack of women director nominees, not enough racial diversity among the acting categories, or the choices made in the documentary or foreign-language category, the Academy’s picks are sure to be questioned. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has made a concerted effort
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Jarin Blaschke — “The Lighthouse” The startling black-and-white cinematography of “The Lighthouse” struck a chord with the Academy, resulting in Blaschke’s first nom after 20 years of work in the independent film scene. Having previously collaborated with director Robert Eggers on their acclaimed horror film “The Witch,” the duo went to new lengths in psychological
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The shortest Oscar season ever has been especially brutal for strategists trying to gain traction with smaller-scale offerings later in the season: Early birds and conventional choices scooped up the lion’s share of Oscar nominations. And yet, as final voting comes to a close on Feb. 4 with certain categories seemingly locked up, it bears
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Jarin Blaschke’s black-and-white cinematography in Robert Eggers’ “The Lighthouse” lends the proceedings a mythic quality and highlights the tour-de-force acting by Willem Dafoe and Robert Pattinson. The monochrome images are in harmony with the elemental story: trapped together in an unforgiving 1890s landscape, two lighthouse keepers begin to lose their grip on sanity. Blaschke, a
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Change sounds like this: South Korean director Bong Joon Ho accepted his foreign film award for “Parasite” at the Golden Globes, saying: “Once you overcome the 1-inch-tall barrier of subtitles, you will be introduced to so many more amazing films.” Bong’s statement echoes Alfonso Cuarón’s comments last year when he took the foreign-language Oscar for
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Haunted houses are always full of hidden passageways, secret rooms and a story or two about someone who used to live there who disappeared or died under mysterious circumstances. The Park house in “Parasite” is no exception to that rule. It was first imagined by director Bong Joon Ho as a place that would be
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Motion capture in one form or another has been around for decades, and certainly the most recognizable modern use comes from “The Lord of the Rings” films in which Andy Serkis portrayed the beady-eyed creature Gollum. The actor wore a special bodysuit, helmet and strategically placed markers so that each detail of the part computer-generated,
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Taut, tense and fluid, the Oscar-nominated script for “1917” reflects a collaboration of old guard and new — Oscar-winning writer-director Sam Mendes and debut feature writer Krysty Wilson-Cairns. They structured the WWI epic as a single shot tracking two young British soldiers, lance corporals Blake (Dean-Charles Chapman) and Schofield (George MacKay). Their mission? Cross no-man’s
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World War I story “1917” dominated the BAFTA film awards, which were awarded Sunday evening at London’s Royal Albert Hall with Graham Norton hosting. The wins for “1917” included best film, best director for Sam Mendes and outstanding British film. The awards are broadcast on the BBC in the United Kingdom and at 5 p.m.
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Trying to predict the unpredictable is part of the agony and the joy of the Academy Awards. For better or worse, people will always remember when “Crash” was named over “Brokeback Mountain” or when “Moonlight” was revealed as the winner (eventually, after “La La Land” was mistakenly announced). Voting is now open for final balloting
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January 30, 2020 10:25AM PT A century after World War I ended, “1917” reminds us of the cost of official policies that figure the best conflict resolution calls for young people to slaughter each other. As two angelic-looking, not-yet-cynical Tommies trudge through no-man’s land to deliver a life-or-death warning, the carnage they encounter demands we
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Great movies always speak directly to the here and now regardless of their actual settings. Taken together, six of 2019’s best-picture nominees manage to survey still-potent American themes across the span of the past century and a half. “Little Women” is set during the Civil War, and while the adaptation, like Louisa May Alcott’s beloved
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